4 Tips To Get Your Baby To Sleep In Their Crib

When we think about transitioning our children, we’re usually thinking of transitioning them to a big kid bed from a crib. But for a lot of parents, transitioning starts sooner than that with when they need their babies to actually transition TO the crib. Oftentimes, new parents are desperate to get any sleep they can, which means that they’re going to do whatever it takes to get that baby to sleep! This means that babies are often co-sleeping, sleeping on mom/dad, sleeping in a Rock-N-Play, or sleeping in a swing or other apparatus. While I totally understand the desire to get some sleep, you do need to be sure baby is as safe as possible and nothing beats the crib when it comes to safety.

I get that it’s tough to get your baby sleeping peacefully in their crib. Let’s weigh this out as if you were the baby…nice, snugly, warm, soft arms of mom/dad OR  a cold, hard, flat crib mattress. Yup, it’s a no-brainer that babies would much prefer sleeping anywhere else than their crib. But again, it goes back to be a safety issue. Sleeping on or with parents can be dangerous if not done properly, since you’ll both be sleeping and accidents can happen to the best of us.

Rock-N-Plays and other equipment are super popular for getting some shut eye, but if you look at the fine print you’ll find that none of these things is manufactured or approved for sleep. They will show you pictures of babies peacefully sleeping in them, however, the fine print will tell you that it’s not made for unsupervised sleep (a little hard to do at night when you’re sleeping too). The same is true for swings, car seats, bouncy chairs, etc.

So what can you do to get your baby sleeping in their crib?

  1. Start baby off in their crib or bassinet from day one. I’m not saying that you have to be 100% consistent with this, but I would be making sure they are very familiar with and sleeping in their crib at least 50-75% of the time for both nights and naps.
  2. If you need to, use equipment like the Rock-N-Play sparingly (like for the final – sometimes tough – nap of the day). This way you will be awake to monitor baby and they won’t get too used to it. You also want to be careful that they don’t develop a flat head and have limited mobility because of prolonged, daily use.
  3. If you want to co-sleep, invest in a side car sleeper or portable bassinet that you can keep right next to your bed. Then everyone can have that closeness, yet still have the peace of mind knowing that no accidents will happen. This will also help baby easily adjust to their crib, when you’re ready to move them out of your room.
  4. If your baby has no idea what the crib looks like yet, no worries! It’s never too late to introduce the crib to them. Start off slowly with hanging out in their room, laying them in the crib to play a bit or do diaper changes in it. Be there with them, keep the lights on, and make it a joyful experience. After a few days to a week of that, it’s time to introduce it for sleep. I would start with bedtime, because children are more tired then and less likely to fight you. Now, here’s where it might get tricky. If they’re still a newborn, then they may not notice much of a change; however, if they’re a bit older, it will be a different story.

Many parents don’t think of “transitioning to the crib” as sleep training, but it can definitely be that way especially for older babies and children. If you’re going to be taking your 8 month old from the Rock-N-Play, or taking your 13 month old from your bed, and asking them to sleep on their own in their crib, you better believe there’s going to be some push-back! Sleep training is not just about stopping night feeds, it’s about making changes to your current schedule that your child may not like. So you need to be prepared with what this might mean for you.

I wouldn’t attempt to make the change until you’re ready to finish what you start; otherwise, you’ll be giving in very quickly or your baby will just get angry. Whenever you try something new (like getting them to sleep in their crib), and you don’t succeed or finish the job, it just leads to a pretty annoyed baby. I would rather see you hold off on making changes until you’re fully ready. Do your research, have the room/space set up and ready to go, be mentally prepared for this move, get some back-up reinforcements if need be, and set a date!


If you’re not sure what type of sleep training you need, or have no idea where to start to make this transition, my DIY Newborn, Babies, and Toddlers/Preschoolers courses can definitely help! Or, if you prefer some more personalized help, I can help with that too! You can see all that I offer over in my Services section. You can click here to set up a free 15min phone call, so you can tell me what’s been going on.

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